On the night of September 10, 2021, the House Ways and Means Committee released legislative text covering a range of green energy tax incentives, a bill that it hopes will be enacted through the budget reconciliation process and it expects to begin markup of on Tuesday, September 14. This Legal Update provides further detail on

On August 10, 2021, the US Senate voted to pass the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (the “IIJA”). The IIJA would provide a total of $1.2 trillion in federal investment in infrastructure, including an unprecedented level of federal investment in electric vehicles and electric vehicle charging infrastructure through the creation of new programs and grants

Section 30D of the US Internal Revenue Code (“IRC”) provides business and individual taxpayers that purchase new qualified plug-in electric drive motor vehicles (“EVs”), including passenger vehicles and light trucks, with a nonrefundable tax credit. Section 30C of the IRC provides a nonrefundable investment tax credit equal to 30 percent of the cost of alternative fuel vehicle refueling property, which includes EV charging stations and hydrogen refueling stations. There are currently three primary proposals under discussion in Washington that could materially change these federal income tax credits. This Legal Update compares key aspects of these proposals. The three proposals are the Biden Administration FY 2022 Budget, the GREEN Act and the Clean Energy for America Act.


Continue Reading Electric Vehicle and Charging Station Tax Credits: Assessing Proposed Changes

On March 31, 2021, the Biden administration released the American Jobs Plan (the “Infrastructure Plan”), which is a proposal that, if ultimately enacted, aims to modernize outdated infrastructure, create additional jobs and increase the United States’ global competitiveness. Alongside the Infrastructure Plan, the Biden administration released a Made in America Tax Plan (the “Tax Plan”),

On Monday, December 21, 2020, the United States Congress passed a second large stimulus bill[1] (the “Relief Bill”) aimed at curtailing the economic disruptions caused by COVID-19. The Relief Bill, among other things, extends renewable energy tax credits for wind projects, solar projects and carbon capture and sequestration and contains specific provisions addressing offshore wind farms. These extensions include a one-year extension for wind projects, a two-year extension for solar projects and a two-year extension for carbon capture and sequestration projects. President Trump is expected to sign the Relief Bill and has until December 28, 2020 to do so, when the current stopgap funding measure expires.
Continue Reading Solar and Wind Tax Credits Extended, Again